. Where Can You Hold Events? Here's the State-by-State Reopening Status | Northstar Meetings Group

Where Can You Hold Events? Here's the State-by-State Reopening Status

New York, New Jersey and Connecticut expand the list of states from which visitors must quarantine.

What Countries Are Open?
What Countries Are Open?
See what countries and international destinations are reopening or adjusting their COVID-19 restrictions by heading to our roundup of the latest updates throughout the world.

Updated July 29, 2020.

The surge of COVID-19 infections continues in the U.S. — and now totals more than 4.2 million cases with 147,000 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Numerous states have seen record numbers of new cases in recent days. On July 28, leaders in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut expanded their 14-day quarantine rule for visitors from states with case spikes to include Kentucky, Illinois and Minnesota (bringing the total to 34 states), as well as Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. New York State also has begun placing enforcement teams at airports to ensure travelers have filled out their State Department of Health traveler forms. The day before, Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser released her own order requiring a 14-day self-quarantine for visitors from 27 different states (see more below).

The widespread rise has caused some state officials — including those in Louisiana, North Carolina, Utah and Washington — to pause their reopening plans, and others to reinstate restrictions that had been lifted, as in Texas and Florida, where bars have again been closed, and in New Mexico and Oregon, where limits to indoor activities have been reinstated. Mask mandates have also spread throughout the country, with more than 30 U.S. states now requiring facial coverings to be worn in public — most recently in Indiana, Minnesota and Vermont.

State-by-state updates follow. See anything missing? Please email us with new information. 

Reopening Status and Event Restrictions for Every State

Alabama
As the statewide stay-at-home order expired, it was replaced by a Safer at Home order that went into effect throughout the state on May 22 and has been extended until at least the end of July. Under that order, non-work gatherings of all sizes are prohibited if six feet of distance can't be maintained between participants. Restaurants and retail stores can reopen at up to 50 percent maximum occupancy. Beaches are open, with social-distancing guidelines. Barbershops and hair salons have been allowed to reopen, while night clubs, theaters and bowling alleys remain closed. As cases have risen, Gov. Kay Ivey has amended the Safer at Home order to include a mask requirement, in effect until the end of July.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social-distancing rules can be followed.

Alaska

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Alaska, which has the fewest coronavirus cases of any state, entered phase 3 of Gov. Mike Dunleavy's "Reopen Alaska Responsibly Plan" on May 22 — allowing most businesses to reopen at full capacity, with a handful of restrictions still in place. Large gatherings are again permitted, but with strict social-distancing and hygiene practices. Visitors are required to be tested within 72 hours to five days prior to arrival or take a test upon arrival, and may only enter the state if they test negative. Those who do not get a test must self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Alaskans are asked to contact health officials before organizing a major event to coordinate communication and ensure a proper plan is in place.

Current meeting limits: Large gatherings are permitted, with social distancing and permission of state public health officials.

Arizona

Arizona has seen a rapid increase in cases, regularly setting new daily records for the highest number of new positive results. On June 29, Gov. Doug Ducey "paused" operations at bars, gyms, theaters and water parks for a month, partially reversing a number of the steps taken as part of phase 1 of its "Returning Stronger" plan, which began in mid-May. A July 9 executive order requires restaurants with indoor seating to operate at less than 50 percent capacity. It also prohibited gatherings of more than 50 people. During a news conference, Ducey urged Arizonans to "arm yourself with a mask," but he has stopped short of requiring that masks be worn in public. Ducey has said he has no plans for cancelling upcoming summer events. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings are limited to 50 people or fewer.

Arkansas

No statewide stay-at-home order was put in place here, and restaurants began serving guest at limited capacity on May 11. On June 15, the state fully entered Phase 2 of reopening, allowing restaurants and other businesses to expand to two-thirds capacity, but with social distancing and mask-wearing encouraged. Outdoor recreation and personal-care locations have reopened. Large indoor venues, including movie theaters, museums and casinos, are open at 33 percent capacity, as are bars with social-distancing limits. But as cases began to surge, Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced on June 25 a pause on further reopening and required that masks be worn statewide beginning July 20

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer people are permitted.

California

Many parts of the state have seen surges in COVID-19 cases, leading Gov. Gavin Newsom on July 13 to again close bars, indoor restaurants, movie theaters and other venues statewide. For the more than 30 counties on the state's monitoring list (the state has 58 counties), Newsom also ordered the closing of indoor operations at fitness centers, churches, personal-care salons, malls, offices, hair salons and barbershops. School district officials in Los Angeles and San Diego also announced that they would not be opening schools in September. Most of the state had entered stage 2 (reopening "lower-risk" workplaces such as retail, offices and manufacturing) or the early phases of stage 3 (with "higher-risk" workplaces reopening, including limited personal care and recreational venues) of Newsom's four-stage Resilience Roadmap. A timeline for stage 4, in which concerts, conventions and sports events with live crowds will be permitted, has not yet been announced. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited in most of the state.

Colorado

On June 1, Gov. Jared Polis transitioned the state from Safer at Home to "Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors," in which high-risk individuals are now encouraged to spend time out of doors. Indoor gyms, bowling alleys and other recreational facilities are open at 50 percent capacity, with no more than 500 people in one setting at a time. Restaurants are allowed to operate at either 50 percent dine-in capacity or 50 persons maximum, whichever is less.  Indoor gatherings are allowed but must be limited to 100 people, among other restrictions. Outdoor events must have no more than 175 people. Bars are now allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity. On July 16, Polis announced a statewide face covering requirement for indoor public spaces, including stores and businesses.

Current meeting limits:  Indoor gatherings limited to 100 people; outdoor events must have no more than 175 people.

Connecticut

On July 28, the state's leaders joined New York and New Jersey in requiring visitors from 34 states, as well as Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., that are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Previously, on May 20, Gov. Ned Lamont began the first phase of his four-phase plan, allowing offices and stores to open their doors at 50 percent capacity and restaurants to open with outdoor seating. On June 1, hair salons and barbershops were permitted to accept clients again. On June 17, the state began phase 2, in which hotels, gyms and indoor restaurants were allowed to reopen. Outdoor gatherings of up to 100 people and indoor gatherings of up to 25 people are now permitted. Outdoor-gathering limits were expected to increase to 250 people by mid-July, but on July 6, Lamont announced that phase 3 would be postponed indefinitely. 

Current meeting limits: Indoor gatherings of up to 25 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 100 people are permitted.

Delaware

The state entered Phase 2 of its recovery plan on June 15, allowing restaurants, casinos, hotels and retail establishments to expand from 30 percent to 60 percent capacity, with face coverings required. Outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people currently are permitted, but recreation facilities, including bowling alleys, skating rinks and sporting facilities, remain closed. On June 30, Gov. John Carney paused any further reopenings and on July 3, ordered all bars in eastern Sussex County to close indefinitely.

Current meeting limits: Indoor gatherings of 10 or fewer and outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people are allowed.

District of Columbia

On July 27, Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered travelers from 27 states to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival, saying the requirement would remain in effect until at least Aug. 10. Days before, Bowser issued an executive order requiring that masks be worn by residents age 3 and older outside the home, including outdoors; the mandate will be enforced with a $1,000 fine for those who do not comply. On June 22, the city entered phase 2 of reopening, allowing for gyms and camps, as well as indoor retail and restaurant dining to resume. Gatherings of up to 50 people are also now permitted. The city entered into phase 1 on May 29, allowing outdoor seating at restaurants, as well as curbside pickup and delivery from nonessential retail stores. Barbershops and hair salons also are now available for appointments.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Florida

As new COVID-19 cases in the state have skyrocketed, Gov. Ron DeSantis first paused, then reversed steps in the state's reopening. On June 26, the state ordered bar owners to stop selling alcohol at their establishments, requiring many that had been opened to close their doors again. Still, the state remains in phase 2 of its "Safe. Smart. Step-by-Step" plan, which allows gyms and stores to operate at full capacity. Gatherings at large venues and beaches are limited to fewer than 50 people, though DeSantis has advised Floridians to avoid large indoor gatherings. As a result of the surge in cases, authorities in Miami-Dade County shut down gyms, party venues and restaurants effective July 8, while Jacksonville will now require face masks. The Florida Keys are accessible once again, discontinuing checkpoints from South Florida and passenger screenings at the airports, with lodging limited to 50 percent capacity. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 50 are prohibited.

Georgia

Beginning June 16, Gov. Brian Kemp permitted gatherings of up to 50 people (with those over 50 banned unless there is at least six feet between each person). Capacity limits have been lifted on movie theaters, restaurants and dining rooms. Bars can now welcome 50 people or 35 percent capacity, whichever is greater. Atlanta has moved ahead with its reopening more slowly, and Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has announced a five-phase plan for the city. On July 1, conventions began to bbe permitted and live performance venues will be allowed to reopen, as long as 21 specific guidelines are met. But as cases have surged in the state, Kemp has pushed back on efforts by city leaders to require masks, going so far as to sue Atlanta's mayor over her efforts to requiie masks be worn.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited when six feet of social distance can't be maintained. 

Hawaii

Governor David Ige extended Hawaii's stay-at-home order and the mandatory 14-day quarantine for all visitors through June 30, but on June 1, most businesses — including gyms, dine-in restaurants and personal services — were allowed to accept clients again, with some variations among islands. The state lifted its quarantine requirement on inter-island travelers on June 16. Ige has announced that beginning in September, all out-of-state travelers will be required to get a COVID-19 test prior to arrival and show proof of a negative result in order to avoid the 14-day quarantine. Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed indoors, and events of up to 100 people are allowed outdoors

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed indoors, and events of up to 100 people are allowed outdoors.

Idaho

Gov. Brad Little announced a four-phase reopening plan, beginning May 1. On June 13, the state entered Phase 4, which allows for gatherings of any size, as long as social-distancing and precautionary measures are in place. Large venues and nightclubs are permitted to reopen, as long as physical distancing is followed. On June 25, as the state saw record numbers of new COVID-19 cases, Little announced that the state would be "tapping the brakes" on its reopening, with those counties in stage 4 remaining there until at least July 23; one county was moved back to stage 3.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size permitted, with social distancing.

Illinois

On June 26, the state entered phase 4 of Gov. J.B. Pritzker's five-step "Restore Illinois" reopening plan, in which gatherings of up to 50 people or 50 percent capacity are permitted and health and fitness clubs, theaters, museums, zoos and indoor restaurant dining can open or expand with capacity restrictions. Hair salons, gyms and other nonessential businesses can reopen if they  have safety measures and other restrictions in place. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Indiana

On July 27, everyone in the state 8 years and older will be required to wear masks in public indoor spaces, on public transportation and outdoors when it's not possible to social distance, according to the new statewide mask order. On June 12, the state entered Phase 4 of Gov. Eric Holcomb's five-stage Back on Track Indiana plan, which allows for social gatherings of up to 250 people, for retail and commercial businesses to open at full capacity and for restaurants to expand indoor dining to 75 percent capacity. Museums, aquariums, bars, movie theaters and bowling alleys can welcome guests at 50 percent capacity. On July 15, it entered phase 4.5, in which events like festivals and fairs can take place, with approval by the state department of health, which will continue for at least two weeks.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted.

Iowa

Beginning May 15, an order from Gov. Kim Reynolds loosened restrictions on all 99 of Iowa's counties. Barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage therapists and salons are allowed to see clients again. Partial reopenings of restaurants, libraries and fitness centers are permitted across the state (previously, these restrictions had been loosened for 77 of the counties). Effective June 12, businesses were permitted to operate at full capacity and theaters, performance venues and swimming pools are allowed to reopen in compliance with state guidance.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Kansas

On June 8, the state entered phase 3 of its "Ad Astra: A Plan to Reopen Kansas," which raised limits on gatherings to 45 people and removed restrictions on nonessential travel. On June 22, Gov. Laura Kelly recommended that the state remain in phase 3. As the state had seen a rise in cases overall, Kelly issued an executive order mandating the use of masks in stores, restaurants and in any public situation where social distancing cannot be maintained, beginning July 3.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 45 or fewer are permitted in most of the state.

Kentucky

Beginning June 29, following the state's "Healthy at Work" program, gatherings of up to 50 people were again allowed, but Gov. Andy Beshear has ordered that anyone over the age of 5 wear a mask in public indoor spaces. Gyms, bowling alleys, retail stores and movie theaters can operate with restrictions, while restaurants are permitted to resume indoor dining services while limiting on the number of customers at any one time.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted. 

Louisiana

On June 5, the state entered phase 2 of its reopening, allowing previously opened businesses to expand to 50-percent occupancy, and bars, breweries, bowling alleys and other entertainment venues to reopen with capacity limits. On June 22, Gov. John Bel Edwards announced that the state would remain in phase 2 for at least 28 more days due to a rise in cases; on July 13, he declared that masks would be required in public. The cap on social gatherings has been raised to 50 people, as long as social distancing can be maintained, although Edwards closed bars for on-site food and drink consumption. Theme parks, music halls and indoor live entertainment must remain closed during phase 2. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 50 are permitted, as long as social-distancing rules are followed.

Maine

On June 1, Maine began stage 2 of its four-step "Restarting Maine's Economy" plan, allowing lodging businesses to open to Maine residents or those who have completed a 14-day quarantine. Gatherings of up to 50 people are now permitted, and all retail stores and museums are now allowed to reopen. Effective June 17, the state's remaining three counties were allowed to reopen indoor dining with additional health and safety protocols, as well as open bars, breweries, gyms, tattoo parlors and nail salons. While indoor bar service as scheduled to resume beginning July 1, Gov. Janet Mills announced that this would be postponed "until further notice."

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

Maryland

Most of the state has entered Phase 2 of the "Maryland Strong: Roadmap to Recovery" reopening plan. Beginning June 12, restaurants and pools are allowed to open indoor dining at 50 percent capacity. On June 19, indoor gyms and fitness studios were allowed to resume at 50 percent capacity and casinos and malls are allowed to reopen with strict precautions. On July 14, Gov. Larry Hogan directed local leaders to better enforce public safety requirements in bars and restaurants, saying state officials have connected an increasing number of cases to non-compliance. On June 26, the Baltimore Mayor Jack Young lifted restrictions on outdoor gatherings and stated that indoor gatherings would be capped at 50 percent of the venue's capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Massachusetts

The Massachusetts stay-at-home advisory expired May 18, as the state entered the first of its four-phase reopening plan. Most of the state (excluding Boston) entered step one of phase 3 on July 6, in which movie theaters, outdoor performance venues, museums, cultural and historical sites, fitness centers and health clubs were allowed to reopen under industry-specific rules and restrictions. Indoor gatherings are now limited to eight people per 1,000 square feet, with no more than 25 people in a single enclosed space, while outdoor gatherings in enclosed spaces are limited to 25 percent of the venue's capacity, with a maximum of 100 people in a single enclosed outdoor space.

Current meeting limits: Indoor gatherings of 25 or fewer and outdoor gatherings of 100 people or fewer are permitted.

Michigan

On June 1, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer moved the entire state to phase 4 of its reopening plan, allowing groups of up to 100 people to gather outdoors and 10 people indoors. On June 8, swimming pools, libraries and museums reopened. On June 10, the state began moving to phase 5 on a region-by-region basis, in which indoor gatherings of up to 50 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people will be permitted. But as cases have spiked, Whitmer has closed indoor service at bars and ordered that residents are required to wear face coverings when indoors or in crowded outdoor spaces.

Current meeting limits: For those regions in phase 5, outdoor gatherings of up to 250  people and indoor gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Minnesota

Beginning July 25, residents are required to wear face masks in stores and indoor gathering spaces. According to the state's "COVID-19 Preparedness Plan," on June 10 the limit to outdoor gatherings increased to 25 people and restaurants will be open for indoor dining at 50-percent capacity, while entertainment venues open at 25-percent capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 25 people permitted.

Mississippi

On June 1, the state shifted from a "safer-at-home" order to a "Safe Return" order. in which groups are capped at 20 people indoors and 50 people outdoors when social distancing is not possible. When social distancing is possible, group gatherings of up to 50 people indoors and up to 100 people outdoors are permitted. The state has begun lifting restrictions in three phases. It is currently in phase 2, in which restaurants, bars and retail stores are allowed to open as long as they operate at 50 percent capacity and abide by strict sanitization rules. Outdoor and indoor arenas can open with restrictions, such as limiting seating to 25 percent capacity. On July 13, as cases in the state rose, Gov. Tate Reeves ordered that 13 counties, require masks in public and that social gatherings be capped at 10 people indoors and 20 people outdoors.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted indoors, and up to 100 people outdoors, as long as social-distancing rules are followed (or up to 20 people indoors and 50 people outdoors without social distancing).

Missouri

Missouri became the first state to allow the resumption of live events when Gov. Mike Parson's "Show Me Strong Recovery" plan went into effect on May 4. It entered Phase 2 on June 16, in which all businesses, including large concert venues and theaters, have resumed operations, at limited capacity and with social-distancing measures in place. The March 21 ban on large gatherings has been allowed to expire.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social-distancing practices are followed.

Montana

The state's stay-at-home order expired April 26, and Gov. Steve Bullock began the three-phased "Reopening the Big Sky" plan, beginning with houses of worship, retail, restaurants and bars, and a few schools. The state entered Phase 2 of reopening on June 1, raising the cap on gatherings to 50 people and for restaurants, bars, pools and gyms were allowed to fill up to 75-percent capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

Nebraska

On June 22, 89 counties entered phase 3 of Gov. Pete Ricketts' "Steps to Get Nebraska Growing" plan. Indoor gatherings expand to 50 percent of the venue capacity and outdoor gatherings expand to 75 capacity, with no gatherings to exceed 10,000 people. All indoor and outdoor venues that hold 500 or more individuals must submit plans to their local health department for approval before reopening or expanding to new capacity limits. Restaurants and bars can expand to 100 percent occupancy (though groups are limited to eight individuals or fewer). Gyms, fitness centers and health clubs can operate at 75 percent capacity. 

Current meeting limits: For those counties in phase 3 of reopening, gatherings of up to 10,000 people permitted, following capacity and social-distancing guidelines (including 50 percent capacity for indoor venues and 75 percent capacity for outdoor venues).

Nevada

As the state saw record-breaking numbers of new cases, Gov. Steve Sisolak mandated that masks be worn in public, including at casinos. The state began Phase 2 of its "Roadmap to Recovery" on May 29, with restaurants allowed to welcome guests in their dining rooms, with restrictions, and most businesses to reopen, but on June 24, Sisolak announced that it would remain in this phase until further notice and that "any discussion of entering Phase 3 will be tabled." The limit on public and private gatherings was raised to 50. On June 4, much of the gaming industry reopened, with strict social distancing and hygiene practices in place. Sinks for hand-washing, mask and glove dispensers and plexiglass around table games are among the safety measures that have been put in place.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

New Hampshire

Gov. Chris Sununu's "Stay at Home 2.0" order expired on June 15, lifting the cap on gatherings, which had been limited to 10 people. Museums, art galleries, bowling alleys and more are allowed to reopen following state guidance. Beginning June 5, hotels were allowed to resume business for in-state residents and out-of-state travelers who had completed a 14-day quarantine. Beginning June 29, indoor movie theaters, performing arts centers, amusement parks and adult day centers were allowed to open with capacity limits, while large hotels can operate at full capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 people permitted.

New Jersey

On July 28, the state's leaders joined New York and Connecticut in requiring visitors from 34 states, as well as Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., that are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. As cases in the state have risen, Gov. Phil Murphy has slowed reopening plans. Previously, following "The Road Back: Restoring Economic Health Through Public Health," the state entered phase 2 on June 15, in which nonessential retail businesses reopened at 50 percent capacity and outdoor dining resumed. Barbershops and salons followed on June 22, and on July 3, Murphy raised the limit on outdoor gatherings to 500 people and indoor gatherings to 25 percent of capacity, with a maximum of 100 people. On June 29, Murphy announced that the planned reopening of indoor dining would be delayed because of " knucklehead behavior" in which people have not been wearing face masks or complying with recommendations for social distancing. On July 8, he expanded the state's mask requirement to outside public spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained. Retail stores can have a limited number of customers inside, and restaurants can continue to provide outdoor service. Movie theaters and other entertainment venues as well as gyms remain closed. 

Current meeting limits: Indoor gatherings of 25 percent of a building's capacity or 100 people (whichever is lower) are permitted, as are outdoor gatherings of up to 500 people.

New Mexico

The state had begun its "All Together New Mexico" plan, allowing the partial reopening of retail, restaurants and more. But as cases have jumped, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham again prohibited indoor dining at restaurants or breweries. Groups remain limited to a maximum of five people. "We're going to continue to prohibit congregating in large groups and numbers of people. We're going to keep that tight and small, we're going to be in our bubbles of five," said Grisham. Individuals are required to wear face masks in public, including, as of July 13, while exercising or at the gym.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 5 people are permitted.

New York

On July 28, the state's leaders joined New Jersey and Connecticut in requiring visitors from 34 states, as well as Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., that are experiencing surges in COVID-19 cases to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Beginning July 14, the state also placed enforcement teams at airports to ensure travelers have filled out their State Department of Health traveler forms. Those who refuse to fill out the form, which includes contact information and details about where the traveler came from and where they are going, will face a $2,000 fine.

Previously, on July 20, New York City entered phase 4 of Gov. Andrew Cuomo's four-step "New York Forward" plan for reopening, allowing outdoor arts and entertainment venues to reopen at 33 percent capacity, indoor arts and entertainment venues to open at 25 percent capacity and social gatherings of up to 50 people to take place, though indoor dining remains prohibited. It joins the rest of the state, which entered this final phase on June 26. On July 9, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he would extend the city's ban on large-scale events requiring a city permit (such as parades and street fairs) until at least Sept. 30. "No, we don’t need big events anytime soon," he said on CNN. "We’ve had a lot of success making New York City healthier and we’ve got to stick to that plan." 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

North Carolina

On May 22, the state entered phase 2 of Gov. Roy Cooper's "North Carolina: Staying Ahead of the Curve" plan, which increased the size of gatherings to up to 10 people indoors and 20 people outdoors, while allowing for the limited reopening of restaurants. Bars, nightclubs and indoor gyms remain closed. As new cases surged throughout the state, on June 24, the governor paused the state's reopening until at least Aug. 7 and mandated that masks be worn by all residents when in public.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people indoors and 20 people outdoors are permitted. 

North Dakota

On May 29, the state moved from moderate to low risk on Doug Burgum's "ND Smart Restart" plan, allowing for dine-in service at restaurants at 75-percent capacity, movie theaters to expand to 65-percent capacity and gatherings of up to 500 people "provided that health criteria is met."

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 500 or fewer are permitted.

Ohio

Beginning July 23, face masks are required to be worn in public spaces statewide. The state entered the latest phase of Gov. Mike DeWine's "Responsible Restart Ohio" plan on June 1, in which catering services, banquet halls and day care centers were allowed to reopen, under strict safety rules. On June 10, entertainment facilities including art galleries, museums and movie theaters reopened, and on June 19, this was extended to casinos, amusement parks and water parks. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Oklahoma

On June 1, the state entered phase 3 of Gov. Kevin Stitt's three-phase "Open Up & Recover Safely (OURS) Plan," under which businesses can resume unrestricted staffing and summer camps can reopen, in addition to the loosening of restrictions permitted under previous phases (such as allowing bars to open and sports activities to resume, while practicing social distancing). As cases in the state have risen, face coverings have begun to be required in some cities.

Current meeting limits: People are directed to avoid groups "that do not readily allow for appropriate social distancing." 

Oregon

Gov. Kate Brown's county-by-county, multiphase "Building a Safe & Strong Oregon," plan has been slowed as cases surged in the state. Brown announced that beginning July 15, indoor social gatherings such as birthday or dinner parties will be limited to 10 or fewer people (with the exemption of faith-based events and businesses). Previously, seven counties imposed a requirement that masks be worn in indoor public spaces, and this was expanded statewide beginning July 1 and to outdoor public spaces on July 15. "Today, I am sounding the alarm: We are at risk of COVID-19 getting out of control in Oregon," Brown tweeted. "Each of us needs to take immediate action to slow the spread of this disease."

Current meeting limits: Indoor gatherings of more than 10 people prohibited.

Pennsylvania

Following Gov. Tom Wolf's "Process to Reopen Pennsylvania," restrictions began to lift on May 8, depending on how much the virus had impacted each part of the state. A region or county needed to average fewer than 50 new positive cases of the virus per 100,000 residents for 14 days, at which time retail could begin to reopen and other businesses could start back up. By July 3, all counties were in the green phase, with restaurants and bars operating at 50 percent capacity, and most other businesses expanding to 75 percent capacity; the phase allows gatherings of up to 250 people. Twelve more counties moved to the green phase on June 26, but on July 1, the State Department of Health issued an updated order requiring the use of face masks in indoor public spaces and in outdoor public spaces when social distancing is not possible.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted for those counties in the "green" phase. 

Puerto Rico

On June 16, Puerto Rico entered phase 3 of Gov. Wanda Vázquez Garced's "slow and gradual" reopening, allowing beaches, movie theaters and gyms to reopen, and restaurants to expand capacity to 50 percent. Indoor venues such as the Puerto Rico Convention Center reopened on July 1. While the island was expected to begin welcoming tourists on July 15 (as long as each visitor produces evidence of a negative result to a COVID-19 test or to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival) this has been postponed until further notice as cases throughout the United States continue to rise. Effective July 1, casinos can open at 75 percent capacity, and shops and restaurants can expand to 75 percent capacity. Public transportation services, wakes and funerals can resume in line with health and safety protocols. Additional updates and resources are available at the Puerto Rico Health Department's online portal.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Rhode Island

On June 30, the state entered phase 3 of Gov. Gina Raimondo's "Reopening RI: Charting the Course" plan, allowing restaurants to expand indoor dining to 66 percent capacity, retail stores to resume operations with capacity limits, and gyms and hair salons to reopen with restrictions. Public mass outdoor gatherings are capped at 250 people, while indoor gatherings are limited to one person per 100 square feet with social distancing.

Current meeting limits: Public mass outdoor gatherings are capped at 250 people, while indoor gatherings are limited to one person per 100 square feet with social distancing.

South Carolina

Gov. Henry McMaster began his "Accelerate South Carolina" plan on April 20, with retail stores limited to 20-percent capacity. Restaurant may provide indoor service following social distancing requirements and clothing, furniture and jewelry stores, bookstores have reopened, with capacity limits. Gyms, hair salons, spas and other close-contact businesses have also been permitted to reopen in a limited capacity, though theaters and nightclubs remain closed. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

South Dakota

Gov. Kristi Noem's "back to normal" plan permitted businesses to reopen, beginning April 28, if the surrounding area had seen cases decreasing for 14 days. There is no cap on the number of people who can meet, but the plan urges individuals to "consider steps to maintain reasonable physical distancing."

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social distancing is practiced.

Tennessee

When the statewide stay-at-home order expired on April 30, "the vast majority of businesses in 89 counties" were allowed to reopen, entering phase 1 of Gov. Bill Lee's "Tennessee Pledge" plan. Currently, restaurants must limit parties to 10 people, among other restrictions, while retail stores are also required to limit customers. Gyms, hair salons, spas and similar close-contact businesses are required to implement strict social distancing and sanitation practices. Amusement parks, movie theaters and other large venues have reopened, with social-distancing requirements in place. On May 21, Lee signed an executive order that raised the maximum number of people allowed to gather for social and leisure activities from 10 to 50. On July 3, as cases in the state rose, Lee signed an order permitting local mayors to institute face-mask requirements at their discretion. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Texas

As Texas saw a skyrocketing number of cases, with the spread taking what Gov. Greg Abbott called a "swift and very dangerous turn," the state first paused its reopening plan and then reinstated some restrictions. The governor has again closed bars and reduced indoor dining at restaurants to less than 50 percent capacity (it had previously increased to 75 percent), and shut down river rafting and tubing. Public outdoor gatherings of 100 people or more will now require approval by local officials; officials may choose to prohibit gatherings of more than 10 people. "Large gatherings are a clear contributor to the rise in COVID-19 cases," Abbott stated. "Restricting the size of groups gatherings will strengthen Texas’ ability to corral this virus and keep Texans safe." As of July 3, residents in counties with 20 or more active COVID-19 cases are required to wear face coverings in public. 

Current meeting limits: Outdoor gatherings of more than 100 people require approval by local officials.

Utah

On May 16, much of the state (excluding the more populous areas, such as Salt Lake City) entered the "low-risk" phase of Gov. Gary Herbert's "Utah Leads Together 2.0" plan, in which team sports are allowed, all businesses can operate and groups of up to 50 people can gather. On June 12, Herbert released updated reopening guidelines and moved one county to the "new normal" phase, which lifts restrictions on gatherings with the caveat that "hygiene measures, physical distancing, face coverings and symptom monitoring are encouraged for all group gatherings." But as the state saw an increase in cases, Herbert announced on July 10 that he is extending Utah's risk status, leaving Salt Lake City as moderate risk (orange), ten counties as normal risk (green) and the rest of the state in low risk (yellow).

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of all sizes are permitted for those counties in the "low risk" phase.

Vermont

Starting June 1, Gov. Phil Scott's "Play Smart and Play Safe" plan allowed for social gatherings of up to 25 people, as well as the reopening of gyms, fitness centers, spas and more. On June 8, restaurants were allowed to permit indoor dining at 25-percent capacity and lodging businesses could open at 50-percent capacity and a week later, low-contact recreational sports were permitted to resume. Beginning June 26, events can now have up to 75 people indoors and up to 150 outdoors, while cultural and entertainment venues, as well as restaurants, can expand capacity for events and dining to 50 percent.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 75 people indoors and up to 150 outdoors are permitted.

Virginia

On July 1, Virginia entered phase 3 of its "Forward Virginia Plan," allowing restaurants to serve indoors at 100 percent capacity and gyms, movie theaters and concert venues to reopen, following social-distance guidelines, though bars are to remain closed and face masks required at all indoor public places. Social gatherings of up to 250 people are now permitted.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted in those areas that are in phase 3 of reopening. 

Washington

As COVID-19 cases rose throughout the state, Gov. Jay Inslee halted any further reopenings and issued an order, effective June 26, requiring that face masks be worn in public or outdoors when social distancing is not possible. On July 7, this was extended to require businesses to enforce the use of face coverings by all customers or visitors. Eight of the state's 39 counties were prepared to move to phase 4, which would lift virtually all restrictions, allowing for gatherings of all sizes. Following Insleee's Safe Start plan, by June 11, 23 counties had entered phase 2 (which allows limited in-store retail, personal care and outdoor recreation) while 10 had entered phase 3 (which allows for gyms, museums and movie theaters to open at 50 percent capacity and for gatherings of up to 50 people). 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted for those counties that have qualified for phase 3 of the reopening plan. 

West Virginia

Restrictions from the statewide stay-at-home order began lifting on certain businesses May 4, while Gov. Jim Justice continued to encourage citizens to stay home. The state is moving forward on Justice's "West Virginia Strong - The Comeback" plan, which allows in-restaurant dining, as well as the reopening of fitness centers and large retail stores. On June 5, the limit on public gatherings increased from 25 to 100 people, and Justice started to permit fairs and festivals beginning July 1. But as the state has seen a spike in COVID-19 cases, Justice announced that beginning July 9, anyone over the age of nine years is required to wear a face mask anytime they are in public and where they are unable to maintain six feet of social distancing.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 100 people are permitted.

Wisconsin

As Gov. Tony Evers' "Safer at Home" initiative expired at the end of May, much of the state entered Phase 1 of his "Badger Bounce Back" plan, allowing for the gathering of up to 10 people, and up to 50 people outdoors. Most businesses, including restaurants and gyms, opened at 25-percent capacity. as well as the reopening of K-12 schooling and childcare services. Phase 2 will expand the limit on gatherings to 50 people, and Phase 3 will remove any cap.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people indoors and 50 people outdoors are permitted.

Wyoming
While Gov. Mark Gordon never issued a stay-at-home order, he began lifting restrictions on gyms, personal-care services and more, on May 1. By June 15, gatherings of up to 250 people (both indoor and outdoor) were permitted, and restaurants, movie theaters and retail businesses were all allowed to reopen. As the state saw an uptick in cases, Gordon extended these limits through at least July 31.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted, as long as social distancing is maintained.