. Which States Are Reopening and Where Can You Hold Events? | Northstar Meetings Group

Which States Are Reopening and Where Can You Hold Events?

Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Ohio and Washington, D.C. transition to the next phase of reopening, as many cities nationwide manage widespread political protests.

What Countries Are Open?
What Countries Are Open?
See what countries and international destinations are reopening or adjusting their COVID-19 restrictions by heading to our roundup of the latest updates throughout the world.

Updated June 1, 2020, 1:30 p.m. EDT.

Every state has begun to loosen its social-distancing restrictions, taking multiphase approaches on differing timelines even as new COVID-19 cases spike in some areas. In most cases, businesses are beginning to reopen and people are permitted to gather in small groups, while larger gatherings and other behavior that's riskier for the spread of the virus continue to be curtailed.

Over the past few days, as protests sparked by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd have flared up in dozens of cities across the country, health officials have raised concerns that so many mass gatherings could fuel a spike in COVID-19 cases. But despite these worries, many states are moving forward with their reopening plans. As June began, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Maine and Ohio all entered the next phases of their reopening processes. Two of the country's biggest coronavirus hotspots — New York City and Los Angeles — also began to loosen citywide restrictions.

State-by-state updates follow. See anything missing? Please email us with new information. 

Reopening Status and Event Restrictions for Every State

Alabama

As the statewide stay-at-home order expired, it was replaced by a Safer at Home order went into effect throughout the state. Under that order, non-work gatherings of all sizes are prohibited if six feet of distance can't be maintained between participants. Bars, restaurants and retail stores can reopen at up to a 50 percent maximum occupancy. Schools are still limited to virtual instruction. Beaches are open, with social-distancing guidelines. Barber shops, hair salons have been allowed to reopen, though night clubs, theaters and bowling alleys remain closed. It is yet to be stated when the next reopening phase, Safer Apart, will begin.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 people are permitted, with unlimited numbers for gatherings at beaches, with social-distancing rules.

Alaska

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Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy on April 24 began allowing the limited reopening of restaurants, stores, hair and nail salons, and other businesses. The state entered phase 2 of its "Reopen Alaska Responsibly Plan" on May 8, allowing most nonessential businesses to reopen at 50 percent capacity and gatherings of up to 50 people to take place. The timing of phase 3, which will allow for "larger gatherings" and for businesses to reopen at 75 percent capacity, remains to be determined.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted, with universal face covering recommended.

Arizona

The state's stay-at-home order expired on May 15, as it entered phase 1 of its "Returning Stronger" plan. Barbershops, dine-in restaurants and a number of casinos have partially opened, with sanitizing and social-distancing measures in place. Gyms and pools are expected to reopen starting May 20. During his May 12 press conference announcing the timeline, Gov. Doug Ducey urged organizations to try “limiting the congregation of groups to no more than 10 persons when feasible and in relation to the size of the location.”

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer people are permitted.

Arkansas

No statewide stay-at-home order was put in place here, and restaurants began reopening, at limited capacity, on May 11. Outdoor, recreation and personal-care locations have reopened. On May 18, large indoor venues, including movie theaters, museums and casinos, were allowed to reopen, as long as audiences were kept to 50 people or fewer. By the end of May, bars had reopened, with social-distancing limits.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer people are permitted.

California

The first state to order all residents to stay at home, California has now begun to relax restrictions in most counties. Most of the state is in stage 2 (reopening "lower-risk" workplaces such as retail, offices and manufacturing) or the early phases of stage 3 (with "higher-risk" workplaces reopening, including limited personal care and recreational venues) of Gov. Gavin Newsom's four-stage Resilience Roadmap. By the end of May, 48 of the state's 58 counties had begun to reopen, including Los Angeles, for which Newsom approved the opening of barbershops and hair salons and in-restaurant dining. The state's Native American tribal casinos, including Pechanga Resort Casino, Sycuan Casino Resort and Valley View Casino & Hotel, with stricter cleaning procedures in place, have started to welcome guests. A timeline for stage 4, in which concerts, conventions and sports events with live crowds will be permitted, has not yet been announced. "Being back at concerts and convention halls with tens of thousands of fans will take some time," Newsom said in late April.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited in most of the state.

Colorado

Beginning April 27, the state shifted from a "safe-at-home" to a "safer-at-home" policy of less-restrictive operations, allowing some retailers to offer curbside pickup and welcome a limited number of in-store customers. On May 4, nonessential offices were allowed to reopen with half the usual staff, as long as strict guidelines are followed and gatherings are kept to 10 people or less. On May 27, in-person dining began to be permitted at restaurants, at 50 percent capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 people or fewer are permitted.

Connecticut

On May 20, Gov. Ned Lamont began the first phase of his four-phase reopening plan, allowing offices and store to open their doors at 50 percent capacity and restaurants to provide outdoor seating. On June 1, hair salons and barber shops reopened. Phase 2, in which hotels, gyms and indoor restaurants will be allowed to reopen, and outdoor gatherings of up to 50 people will be permitted, is scheduled to start June 20.

Current meeting limits: Social and recreational gatherings of more than five people are prohibited.

Delaware

The state's recovery plan has begun to enter phase 1, with restaurants, casinos, hotels and retail establishments allowed to reopen at 30 percent capacity, with face coverings required. 

Current meeting limits: Groups of 10 or fewer are allowed.

District of Columbia

The city entered into phase 1 on May 29, allowing outdoor seating at restaurants, as well as curbside pickup and delivery from nonessential retail stores. Barbershops and hair salons also open for appointments.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of all sizes are prohibited.

Florida

On May 18, the state moved into phase 1 of its "Safe. Smart. Step-by-Step" plan, which allows restaurants, gyms and stores to operate at 50 percent capacity, and limits gatherings at large venues and beaches to fewer than 10 people. Bars and nightclubs remain closed. No date has been set for starting phase 2, in which gatherings of up to 50 people will be permitted and businesses and restaurants will operate at 75 percent of capacity. On June 1, Miami-Dade County beaches and hotels were allowed to begin reopening on June 1. Florida Keys officials aim to begin reopening the destination to tourists on June 1, removing checkpoints from South Florida and passenger screenings at the airports, with lodging limited to 50 percent capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited.

Georgia

Restaurants resumed dine-in service and movie theaters were allowed to reopen beginning April 24 under Gov. Brian Kemp's controversial, statewide reopening order. Gyms, hair and nail salons, bowling alleys and tattoo parlors have followed, opening with restrictions. Atlanta has moved ahead with its reopening more slowly, and Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced a five-phase reopening plan for the city, of which it is currently at Phase 1, with residents encouraged to stay home. Phase 2 could begin as early as late May, allowing for private gatherings of up to 10 people.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited when six feet of social distance can't be maintained.

Hawaii

Governor David Ige extended Hawaii's stay-at-home order and the mandatory 14-day quarantine for all visitors through June 30, but on June 1, most businesses — including gyms, dine-in restaurants and personal services — were allowed to reopen, with some variations among islands. One exception is Oahu, which will hold off reopening dine-in restaurant service and attractions such as Honolulu Zoo until June 5.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Idaho

Gov. Brad Little announced a four-phase reopening plan, beginning May 1 with places of worship, daycare facilities and youth activities (with physical-distancing guidelines enforced). Phase 4, targeted to begin June 14, would allow for gatherings of more than 50 people.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited.

Illinois

On May 29, most of Illinois became eligible to enter phase 3 of Gov. J.B. Pritzker's five-step "Restore Illinois" reopening plan, which allows for for gatherings of up to 10 people and the return of gyms and outdoor classes (this excludes Chicago, which is expected to enter Phase 3 on June 3). That will be followed by phase 4, permitting groups of up to 50 to gather. Schools remain closed, with remote learning still in effect.  

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Indiana

On May 4, the state moved to stage 2 of its "Back on Track Indiana" reopening plan. Nonessential businesses have reopened, with retail and commercial businesses such as malls restricted to 50 percent capacity and common areas restricted to 25 percent capacity. Personal services like hair salons, barber shops, spas and tattoo parlors began to open May 11 by appointment only. Restaurants and bars began opening on May 11 at 50 percent capacity, but bar seating remains prohibited. Gatherings of 25 people or less are allowed as long as social-distancing measures are followed. The state will transition to stage 3 on May 24, which will allow for gatherings of up to 100 people. On June 14 it plans to begin stage 4 (allowing groups of up to 250), then on July 4 to Stage 5 (permitting groups of more than 250).

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted.

Iowa

Beginning May 15, an order from Gov. Kim Reynolds loosened restrictions on all 99 of Iowa's counties. Barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage therapists and salons are allowed to see clients again. Partial reopenings of restaurants, libraries and fitness centers are permitted across the state (previously, these restrictions had been loosened for 77 of the counties). Bars, casinos and theaters must remain closed until at least May 27.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Kansas

Restrictions in Kansas began loosening on May 4 as the state began to follow its four-stage "Ad Astra: A Plan to Reopen Kansas." On May 18, it entered phase 1.5, in which gatherings remained capped at 10 people, masks were strongly encouraged in public, and nail salons, barber shops and other personal service businesses were allowed to reopen by appointment only. Phase 2 (in which gatherings of up to 30 people will be permitted) is now scheduled to begin June 1, followed by phase 3 (allowing gatherings of up to 90 people) no earlier than June 15, and "Phase Out" (where gatherings of all sizes would be permitted) no earlier than June 29.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Kentucky

The state is currently in phase 1 of its "Healthy at Work" program, with government offices and agencies now open, as well as stores and restaurants. Beginning May 25, social gatherings of up to 10 people were again allowed, and throughout June, the state will see the reopening of movie theaters, museums, campgrounds and childcare services. By July, the state is expected to permit groups of up to 50 people.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted. 

Louisiana

Louisiana began phase 1 of its reopening on May 15, loosening restrictions on gyms, churches, salons and restaurants. But Gov. John Bel Edwards announced additional, last-minute adjustments to his executive order. Now, casinos are permitted to reopen at 25 percent capacity (and reopen 50 percent of their games), while shopping malls are also allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of more than 10 permitted, as long as social distancing rules are followed.

Maine

On June 1, Maine began stage 2 of its four-step "Restarting Maine's Economy" plan, allowing lodging businesses to open to Maine residents or those who have completed a 14-day quarantine. Gatherings of up to 50 people are now permitted, and all retail stores and museums are now allowed to reopen.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

Maryland

On May 15, the state entered the first "Low Risk" stage of its three-step "Maryland Strong: Roadmap to Recovery," with barbershops and hair salons allowed to reopen by appointment only, and manufacturing allowed to resume. Nonessential stores and places of worship are now allowed to operate at 50 percent capacity. Since May 29, restaurants are allowed to reopen outdoor dining.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts' stay-at-home advisory expired May 18, as the state entered the first of its four-phase plan. This allows for the gradual reopening of businesses, starting with manufacturing and construction, with the addition of outdoor recreation facilities, hair salons and retail on May 25, and gatherings of up to 10 people. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Michigan

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer extended the state's stay-at-home order to May 28, though retail stores are open for curbside pickup, and the construction and real estate industries resumed some business. Most of the state is currently in phase 3 of its six-stage "Safe Start" plan, and on May 22, Whitmer lifted the statewide ban on gatherings of up to 10 people. Traverse City and the upper peninsula region have entered phase 4, which allows for gatherings limited to “small groups with social distancing.” Phase 5 will permit “Increased but still limited-sized groups with social distancing.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Minnesota

Beginning May 18, the state's stay-at-home order expired, and the state began to implement its "COVID-19 Preparedness Plan," which allows for the reopening of retail stores at 50 percent capacity. But in-restaurant dining remains prohibited, and gyms, bars, museums and other places of "public amusement" are still closed. Gov. Tim Walz has said that when the stay-at-home order ends, social gatherings of up to 10 people will be permitted.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are prohibited.

Mississippi

Despite a record number of new coronavirus cases, the state's "safer-at-home" order is expected to expire June 1. The state has begun lifting restrictions in three phases. It is currently in phase 2, in which restaurants, bars and retail stores are allowed to open as long as they operate at 50 percent capacity and abide by strict sanitation rules. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted indoors, and up to 100 people outdoors, as long as social distancing rules are followed (or up to 20 people indoors and 50 people outdoors without social distancing).

Missouri

Missouri became the first state to allow the resumption of live events when Gov. Mike Parson's "Show Me Strong Recovery" plan went into effect on May 4. All businesses, including large concert venues and theaters, have resumed operations, at limited capacity and with social-distancing measures in place. The March 21 ban on large gatherings has been allowed to expire.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social-distancing practices are followed.

Montana

The state's stay-at-home order expired April 26, and Gov. Steve Bullock began the three-phased "Reopening the Big Sky" plan, beginning with houses of worship, retail, restaurants and bars, and a few schools. Gatherings are capped at 10 people, with physical-distancing required. In phase 2, scheduled to begin June 1, groups of 50 people will be permitted, while phase 3 will lift all limits to group size. On June 1, restaurants, bars, pools and gyms were allowed to fill up to 75 percent capacity.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Nebraska

Beginning May 4, Gov. Pete Ricketts, kicked off the state's "Steps to Get Nebraska Growing" plan. Restaurants are permitted to allow in-room customers up to 50 percent of its normal capacity, while salons and tattoo parlors can accept up to 10 people at a time.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted, with everyone wearing face masks.

Nevada

The state began phase 1 of its "Roadmap to Recovery" on May 9, with restaurants allowed to welcome guests in their dining rooms, with restrictions. Barber shops, nail salons and retails stores (but not malls) were also allowed to reopen, but bars, theaters, bowling alleys and tattoo parlors remain closed.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

New Hampshire

On May 1, Gov. Chris Sununu announced "Stay at Home 2.0". The move extends the stay-at-home order through the end of May. Beginning May 4, hospitals were able to offer certain procedures that had been shut down for space. Starting May 11, retail stores could open at 50 percent store capacity, and barbershops, hair salons, drive-in theaters and golf courses could also reopen with restrictions. Starting May 18, restaurants could start offering outdoor dining. The stay-at-home order has been extended to June 15.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are prohibited.

New Jersey

Following Gov. Phil Murphy's "The Road Back: Restoring Economic Health through Public Health" plan, the state is currently in its pre-reopening phase, though nonessential construction and curbside retail pickup was allowed to begin on May 18. 

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are prohibited.

New Mexico

Beginning May 16, the state began its "All Together New Mexico" plan, allowing retailers to operate at 25 percent capacity, with masks required of everyone in public. Groups remain limited to a maximum of five people. “We’re going to continue to prohibit congregating in large groups and numbers of people. We’re going to keep that tight and small, we’re going to be in our bubbles of five,” said Gov. Lujan Grisham. Phase 2, in which theaters, bars and casinos will be allowed to reopen, is expected to begin in June.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 5 people are permitted.

New York

On May 29, five state regions entered Phase 2 of Gov. Andrew Cuomo's four-step "New York Forward," allowing for office-based work, in-store retail, real estate services and some barber shop services to resume. On May 22, Cuomo granted that gatherings of up to 10 people would be permitted throughout the state. Cuomo also announced that New York City would enter Phase 1 of reopening, in which construction, agriculture and manufacturing industries and curbside pickup at retail stores is allowed to return, will begin June 8. Mayor Bill de Blasio had previously announced that the city will ban all public events through June

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

North Carolina

On May 22, the state has entered phase 2 of Gov. Roy Cooper's "North Carolina: Staying Ahead of the Curve" plan, which increased the size of gatherings to up to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors, while allowing for the limited reopening of restaurants. Bars, nightclubs and indoor gyms remain closed.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors are permitted. 

North Dakota

Following Gov. Doug Burgum's "ND Smart Restart" plan, the state moved from the "High Risk" phase to "Moderate" on May 15, allowing for dine-in service at restaurants at 50 percent capacity and gatherings of up to 50 people "provided that health criteria is met."

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

Ohio

The state has been moving forward on Gov. Mike DeWine's "Responsible Restart Ohio" plan, entering the latest phase on June 1, in which catering services, banquet halls and day care centers were allowed to reopen, under strict safety rules.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 300 people at restaurants and banquet halls are permitted, following social-distancing rules.

Oklahoma

Following Gov. Kevin Stitt's three-phase "Open Up & Recover Safely (OURS) Plan," the state entered phase 2 on May 15, in which organized sports activities resumed, bars could open at lower capacity, and funerals and weddings could take place. No specific guidelines for group size were outlined, though the plan urges residents to "avoid socializing in groups that do not readily allow for appropriate social distancing."

Current meeting limits: Individuals are directed to avoid groups "that do not readily allow for appropriate social distancing."

Oregon

Retail stores and childcare centers throughout the state were permitted to reopen beginning May 15. Thirty-one of Oregon's 33 counties began phase 1 of its process, allowing restaurants and bars to accept dine-in patrons, and gyms, health clubs, hair salons, nail salons and shopping malls to welcome clients with strict social-distancing limits. Phase 1 also allows for gatherings of up to 25 people.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted.

Pennsylvania

Following Gov. Tom Wolf's "Process to Reopen Pennsylvania," restrictions would began to lift starting May 8, depending on how much the virus had impacted each part of the state. A region or county needed to average fewer than 50 new positive cases of the virus per 100,000 residents for 14 days, at which time retail could begin to reopen and other businesses could start back up. On May 15, 13 counties in southwestern Pennsylvania moved from "red" to "yellow" phases, joining 24 others that had gone "yellow" the week before. Wolf also announced that 12 other counties would have restrictions lifted on May 22, if downward trends continue.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted for those counties in the "yellow" phase. 

Rhode Island

On May 9, Gov. Gina Raimondo's "Reopening RI: Charting the Course" plan kicked off, with the lifting of the state's stay-at-home order. Retail stores, and some hair salons and barbershops reopened within limits. Gatherings are limited to 10 people. On May 19, Gov. Raimondo announced a Crushing Covid smartphone app for residents. No timeline has been set for phase 2, which will increase the group limit to 15 people; or phase 3, which increases the limit to 50 people, but Raimondo has announced that in-person summer camp will be allowed to start on June 29.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

South Carolina

Gov. Henry McMaster began his "Accelerate South Carolina" plan on April 20, with retail stores limited to 20 percent capacity. Outdoor dining services are now allowed and daycare facilities are open. Gatherings remain limited to 10 people or fewer, but Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said that in-person graduation ceremonies with gatherings of large groups of people may begin as early as May 29.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

South Dakota

Gov. Kristi Noem's “back to normal” plan permitted businesses to reopen, beginning April 28, if the surrounding area had seen cases decreasing for 14 days. There is no cap on the number of people who can meet, but the plan urges individuals to "consider steps to maintain reasonable physical distancing."

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social distancing is practiced.

Tennessee
The statewide stay-at-home directive for the state expired on April 30, and "the vast majority of businesses in 89 counties" were allowed to reopen May 1, entering phase 1 of Gov. Bill Lee's "Tennessee Pledge" plan. Restaurants must operate with 50 percent capacity. On May 21, Lee signed an executive order that raised the maximum number of people allowed to gather for social and leisure activities from 10 to 50.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Texas

Gov. Greg Abbott allowed the statewide stay-at-home initiative to expire April 30. All retail stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls were permitted to reopen on May 1, with limited capacity, as part of Abbott's "Reopen Texas" plan. On May 18, the state entered phase 2 of the plan, as childcare facilities and offices were permitted to reopen. Beginning May 22, large venues including bingo halls, bowling alleys and skating rinks were allowed to accept patrons at 25 percent capacity. On May 31, golf, baseball, tennis and other professional sports began to be allowed to apply to the Department of State Health Services for approval to hold events without spectators.

Current meeting limits: No explicit maximum, but Abbott's executive order urges individuals to “minimize social gatherings and minimize in-person contact with people who are not in the same household.” 

Utah

On May 16, much of the state (excluding the more populous areas, such as Salt Lake City) entered the "low risk" phase of Gov. Gary Herbert's "Utah Leads Together 2.0" plan, in which team sports are allowed, all businesses can operate and groups of up to 50 people can gather.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted, excluding Salt Lake City and other populous areas.

Vermont

Phase 1 of Gov. Phil Scott's "Play Smart and Play Safe" plan is currently in effect, allowing for elective medical procedures to resume and gatherings of up to 10 people.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Virginia

On May 15, Virginia began phase 1 of its "Forward Virginia Plan," with retail outlets, farmers markets and grooming services allowed to get back to business, with limited occupancy. The city of Richmond was excluded from the reopening at the request of Mayor Levar Stoney, out of concern for the safety of the more populated location. Gatherings are limited to 10 or fewer people until at least June 10, when phase 2 of the plan is expected to begin.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted. 

Washington

Gov. Jay Inslee imposed a stay-at-home order was extended through July 12, with some flexibility for locations to petition for limited reopening. The state has entered phase 1 of Inslee's "Safe Start" plan, with a few smaller counties entering phase 2, allowing for gatherings of up to five people.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of any size are prohibited, excluding smaller counties where groups of up to 5 are permitted. 

West Virginia

Restrictions from the statewide "stay-at-home" order began lifting on certain businesses May 4, while Gov. Jim Justice continued to encourage citizens to stay home. The state is currently in Week 4 of Justice's "West Virginia Strong - The Comeback" plan, which allows in-restaurant dining, as well as the reopening of fitness centers and large retail stores.  Indoor shopping malls were allowed to begin reopening on May 21. On May 26, bars began to reopen at 50 percent capacity, as well as museums and zoos.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted.

Wisconsin

Once Gov. Tony Evers' "Safer at Home" initiative expires, likely at the end of May, the state will enter phase 1 of his "Badger Bounce Back" plan, allowing for the gathering of up to 10 people, as well as the reopening of K-12 schooling and childcare services. Phase 2 will expand the limit on gatherings to 50 people, and Phase 3 will remove any cap.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of all sizes are prohibited.

Wyoming
While Gov. Mark Gordon never issued a stay-at-home order, he began lifting restrictions on gyms, personal-care services and more, on May 1. On May 13, Gordon raised the maximum on number of people permitted to gather to 25. “The size change for gatherings is significant but does not allow for large events,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Alexia Harrist. The state began to further loosen restrictions beginning May 31. Gordon said he expects to begin allowing gatherings of up to 250 people starting July 1.

Current meeting limits: Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted.