Things To Do In

Costa Rica

Learn why you should host your next meeting, incentive, event or conference in Costa Rica. 

Why Costa Rica for Your Next Meeting or Event?

With its reputation as an eco-friendly paradise, Costa Rica offers a naturally beautiful backdrop for meetings and incentives. The country’s offerings of modern and unique event spaces, including the stunning new Centro de Convenciones de Costa Rica in the capital of San Jose, complement its lush rainforest, stunning beaches and alluring wildlife.

Only in Costa Rica

This Central American country makes good on its decidedly green promises, with 95 percent of all the energy it consumes coming from renewable sources. The government’s goal, in fact, is for the entire nation to be carbon-neutral by 2021. Costa Rica also happens to be home to the happiest people in the world, according to survey results from the Happy Planet Index

Costa Rica Travel Essentials

Taxes: 13 percent sales tax; 10 percent service tax; total tax on hotel rooms, 23 percent
Total number of hotel rooms: San José, 7,426 rooms; Guanacaste province, 5,850 rooms 
Convention Centers:
In San Jose, Centro de Convenciones de Costa Rica; exhibit space, 15,000 square feet; number of meeting rooms, 12; In Guanacaste, Centro de Convenciones Coopeguanacaste, located in Guanacaste province on the Pacific Coast; exhibit space, 18,600 square feet; number of meeting rooms, 1
CVB: Costa Rica Convention Bureau, 011-506-2221-3753; 011-506-2256-4216
Local Currency:
Costa Rican colón (1 colón is equal to US$.0016)
Power:
110 volt (same as United States)
Time zone:
Central Standard Time

Transportation In & Around Costa Rica

• San José: Juan Santamaria International Airport, about 12 miles from San José. Transfer cost by taxi, about $30
 
• Liberia, Guanacaste: Daniel Oduber Quirós International Airport, about 11 miles from Liberia. Transfer cost by taxi, about $30

Meeting Venues

Venue Additions & Renovations in Costa Rica

• Slated to open in February, the Santarena Hotel is set in Las Catalinas, a Pacific coast beach town in the Guanacaste province, the area of northwestern Costa Rica that’s popular for both leisure and incentive travel. The 45-room property will offer ocean views and multiple dining venues, as well as a rooftop lounge and pool. Indoor and outdoor event space will include the Plaza, an open-air venue with ocean views and space for 600.

The Nayara Tented Camp, a sister property to the Nayara Resort, Spa & Gardens and Nayara Springs, is scheduled to open in fall 2019 in Arenal Volcano National Park, in the northern zone that lies north of San José. The property will have 18 luxury tents, each of which will have a master suite with en-suite bathroom and outdoor shower. Each tent also will have an outdoor living area and a plunge pool fed by water from nearby hot springs. The camp also will feature a swim-up bar, a family-friendly pool and an open-air yoga pavilion.

Recent Hotel & Venue Additions

Nicoya Peninsula

Hotel Nantipa, a Small Luxury Hotels of the World Hotel in Santa Teresa de Cobano, has opened on Costa Rica’s Nicoya Peninsula. The posh 15-room property, which sits between the jungle and the ocean, is designed to allow small groups to enjoy the region’s natural beauty while being pampered in stylish accommodations with modern comforts like air conditioning, WiFi and a minibar. Room choices include beachfront suites as well as bungalows furnished with hammocks. Guests also can relax at the swimming pool and savor new culinary experiences at the hotel’s restaurant, which serves Costa Rican specialties made with locally sourced ingredients, including fresh-caught seafood. Guests can partake in activities that range from surfing lessons and horseback riding on the beach to hikes to the nearby Montezuma waterfall — and hopping a boat to Tortuga Island, part of the Islas Negritos Biological Reserve.

• Small incentive groups might find the perfect fit at Hacienda Barrigona, a 500-acre property in Costa Rica’s Blue Zone on the Nicoya Peninsula. An extensive refurbishment has resulted in the debut of 10 guest rooms spread among three villas, with common areas that include swimming pools, open-air dining, and Bali-style yoga and meditation studios. The property specializes in customized group-wellness retreats, as well as programs designed to awaken creativity, with a menu of diverse activities that can include surfing, writing, art and photography. Planners also can make good use of the property’s scenic setting: Up to 100 people can be hosted for private events in a postcard-worthy open-air space, between a private beach and a verdant jungle.

San José

• The Centro de Convenciones de Costa Rica opened in 2018, near Juan Santamaria International Airport and the capital of San José. The US$35 million facility features an environmentally sustainable design that includes internal and external LED lighting and 2.5 acres of solar roof panels.
 
Escazú

• New hotels in the San José metropolitan area include the 126-room AC Hotel San Jose Escazú, which opened in 2018 in upscale Escazú. The property has a European-inspired restaurant, a fitness center and 2,143 square feet of meeting and event space, including five meeting rooms.
 
Guanacaste
 
• Guanacaste has witnessed the debut of several meeting- and incentive-level hotels in recent months. Among them is the 150-room W Costa Rica – Reserva Conchal which is enveloped by a 2,300-acre nature reserve. Groups can make use of nearly 13,000 square feet of event space, including eight meeting and event rooms, and partake in activities like beach games and deejay breaks.
 
• The 294-room Planet Hollywood Beach Resort Costa Rica also opened recently here. The all-inclusive property offers group package options that include private check-in, private group dinners and free group activities. Guests also can sign up for treatments at the PH Spa & Beauty Bar and create their own theme music for the visit, using Planet Hollywood’s Your Soundtrack music program.
 
• The 120-room Margaritaville Beach Resort Playa Flamingo debuted in November 2018 along one of Guanacaste’s picturesque beaches, after an extensive redesign of the former Flamingo Beach Resort & Spa. The property has a water sports center, a spa, tennis courts and a movie theater, and offers 3,264 square feet of indoor event space, as well as outdoor settings for receptions and meals.  
 
Peninsula Papagayo          

• The 182-room Four Seasons Resort Costa Rica at Peninsula Papagayo has unveiled a new Playa Blanca Terrace Hospitality Suite, an ocean-view venue designed by Costa Rican architect Ronald Zurcher with indoor and outdoor space for small-group events. The property recently added a food truck that serves Costa Rican fare and burgers; for private events, planners can customize the menu and add their own signage/logos to the truck. Late in 2018, the resort added a series of new features and amenities, including a revamped spa and wellness center with a hammam room; a steakhouse, Nemare; and a private concierge lounge. The property offers a total of 14,400 square feet of meeting and event space.

Costa Rica Meeting Hotels

Things to Do

Extending Your Trip in Costa Rica

• Take a stroll through the Mercado Central, San José’s Central Market, which dates from 1880. Visitors can wander more than 200 shops and stalls to grab a chifrijo, a favorite snack of pork rinds and fried beans, and peruse the amazing array of local produce on display.

 
• Costa Rica’s tasty dishes (olla de carne, patacones, flan) can be found throughout the country.To get the deep dish on the country’s food and beverage, Foodie Tours Costa Rica offers customizable excursions, including a “farm to table essential gastronomy experience” and a contemporary cuisine program that showcases the creativity of San José’s chefs.

• Costa Rica is the world’s 13th largest coffee producer. Learn about the entire production process — and enjoy ample opportunities to sample java — during guided visits to a number of farms around the countryside. Top choices include Hacienda Espiritu Santo (phone: 011-506-4104-0500), a 600-acre coffee plantation near San Jose in Naranjo, where visitors can observe how farmers maintain and harvest coffee crops and learn how the process has evolved over the years. Also worth a visit is Finca Rosa Blanca, a self-described “coffee plantation resort” that offers boutique-style accommodations as well as an organic coffee tour; participants can pick during the harvest season, from October to January. After the tour, groups can relax on the outdoor deck as they sample a fresh cup, accompanied by homemade biscuits and cookies. The property also offers a seasonal tasting menu that features ingredients from Rosa Blanca’s own organic greenhouse.

• The country is also known for its scrumptious chocolates, crafted from locally grown beans. Rainforest Chocolate Tour in La Fortuna, near the Arenal Volcano, offers an interactive program that teaches groups and individuals about cocoa-bean harvesting and grinding, and developing organic chocolate. Desafio Adventure Co. offers a chocolate tour in the same region, with a visit to a plantation that sells cocoa beans to a woman’s cooperative. Desafio also has a program that combines a chocolate tour with a guided nature hike to the La Fortuna waterfall, where participants can swim in the gentle waters.

• For a whale of a time, catch a cruise to view the majestic mammals along the southern Pacific coast. Since humpback whales are present year-round here, it’s especially easy to plan a visit.

Get Active & Outdoors

• Costa Rica is a nation that begs to be actively explored. For climbing and rappelling, Guanacaste and La Fortuna are the top picks, while Chirripo National Park — home to the second-highest peak in Central America, at 12,500 feet — provides an awe-inspiring challenge and equally exciting views. Ziplines let guests explore the lush canopy from a unique vantage point; there are a number of operators in various locations around Costa Rica, including Arenal, Guanacaste, Jaco and Manuel Antonio. Horseback riding is another fun way to immerse groups in this country's beautiful countryside — especially in Guanacaste, where ranches provide the perfect setting for saddling up. Contact the convention bureau to source outfitters and destination management firms that can arrange any of the activities listed here and below.
 
• Participants will find new ways to enjoy their free time in the Peninsula Papagayo resort area. In August 2018, a new program called Papagayo Bike Share launched, with a fleet of 60 electric-assist, GPS-equipped bicycles. Riders can make use of seven docking stations around the peninsula as they explore. In addition, visitors can take advantage of the new Papagayo Explorers Club, which allows participants to join expert guides — including biologists and naturalists — for only-in-Costa-Rica excursions like the Cacao Volcano Expedition, which includes a 4X4 vehicle ride through the nation's lowest-altitude cloud forest to the crater of an inactive volcano. Horseback riding and "underwater scooter" rides are among the additional offerings.
 
• World-class river rafting awaits along the Pacuare River, with excursions that can last several hours or several days, with ample opportunities to observe the local flora and fauna while navigating the rapids. Tubing is another way to experience Costa Rica's spectacular scenery and view wildlife, especially in Guanacaste, Sarapiqui, Manuel Antonio National Park and Arenal.
 
• Water-based fun also awaits just off the coast, with diving and snorkeling especially rewarding, thanks to the views of unspoiled coral reefs and colorful fish. On the Pacific coast, visitors can explore underwater caves and dramatic rock formations at Manual Antonio National Park, while on the Caribbean side, more than 120 species of fish and 40 species of crustaceans make their home along the coral reefs of Manzanillo Beach and Cahuita National Park, providing plenty of memorable snorkeling possibilities.

Costa Rica Excursions

Volcanos and wildlife
Perfectly situated between the Arenal volcano and Lake Arenal, the Arenal Observatory Lodge & Spa is an ideal place for a nature-focused stay, with gorgeous views at every turn. Guests here can enjoy hiking along seven miles of trails as well as horseback riding and mountain biking through the dramatic scenery. Guests will want to keep their eyes open for abundant wildlife, including monkeys, anteaters and coatis, as well as 500 species of birds.
 
Up in the clouds
National Geographic calls it "the jewel in the crown of cloud forests," and with good reason. The postcard-perfect Monteverde Cloud Forest is lined with trails that make it easy for visitors to enjoy the scenery, while the Monteverde Wildlife Refuge offers after-dark tours that provide a fascinating glimpse of the region's nocturnal inhabitants, including tree snakes, foxes, sloths and monkeys.
 
Get lost…and found
La Senda Costa Rica is a farm/nature preserve/wellness sanctuary set on 74 acres in Guanacasta, where small incentive groups can take cooking classes and relax during yoga sessions. La Senda also houses an enormous labrynth where visitors can wander.
 
Pet the locals
Translated as "Land of the Strays," Territorio de Zaguates is a nonprofit rescue shelter for stray dogs in the mountains of Alajuela. Here, visitors can take part in a wide-ranging, no-kill effort to take care of more than 1,300 dogs — they can even go on walks through the countryside with the canine residents.
 
Hail a taxi
Andaz Costa Rica Resort at Peninsula Papagayo recently debuted a new Nimbu water taxi, which takes guests to the new Andaz Beach House and is also available for private tours around the coastline.
 
Festival Time

This colorful country offers a wealth of cultural and historical activities. Plan your event to coincide with one of these traditional festivals (contact the Costa Rica Convention Bureau for more information):

• The annual Fiestas Zapote, which takes place in January, centers around a large-scale rodeo in San José.

• The pre-Lenten Limón Carnival brings lots of costumes, floats and music to the streets of the Caribbean port city of Limón.

• A celebration that takes place in two indigenous communities, the Fiestas de los Diablitos (Festival of the Little Devils) includes costumed locals re-enacting — through music and dance — a victory over Spanish Consquistadors. The event takes place in the southern Pacific towns of Boruca in December and Rey Curre in February.